ICE blogs

June 30, 2017

Fake news inquiry

Filed under: News, ethical space editors blog, Headlines, journalism, ethics training — news_editor @ 1:01 pm

In January 2017, parliament’s culture, media and sport committee set up an inquiry to investigate ‘the growing phenomenon of widespread dissemination, through social media and the internet, and acceptance as fact of stories of uncertain provenance or accuracy’. It followed the public outcry over deception in political campaigning during the UK’s EU Referendum and the USA’s presidential election in 2016.
A detailed analysis of the submissions to the inquiry by Vian Bakir and Andrew McStay, of Bangor University, can be accessed at

http://www.meccsa.org.uk/news/three-d-issue-28-combatting-fake-news-analysis-of-submissions-to-the-fake-news-inquiry/.

March 24, 2013

Citizen media focus for colloquium

A two-day colloquium on citizen media is to be held 13-14 June 2013 in the Manchester Conference Centre. It is being organised by the Division of Languages and Intercultural Studies, at the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures, University of Manchester.

The rapid shift from a mass media to a digital media culture in the past couple of decades has been the subject of considerable research. One important facet of this shift has been the process of media convergence and the concomitant blurring of boundaries between production and consumption practices in a wide range of contexts, including citizen journalism (news reporting, community radio and television, documentary filmmaking), individual or participatory co-creational work (self-broadcasting, crowdsourcing, fansubbing, scanlation, gaming), networked platforms of public deliberation (blogging, wikis) and other performative expressions of publicness (graffiti and citizen photography). Focusing on the involvement of citizens in this emergent digital culture, this two-day colloquium aims to bring together researchers and citizen media practitioners from different disciplinary and professional backgrounds with a view to sharing experiences and debating a number of recurrent themes in the field. These include:

• interrogating the ‘citizen’ in ‘citizen media’: what senses of ‘citizenship’ are activated in citizen media practices, and with what implications;
• the dialectic between citizen media and new technologies: empowering synergy or regulative tension;
• strategic vs therapeutic forms of self-mediation: activism, hacktivism, alter-globalism, altruistic humanitarianism and narcisstic exhibitionism;
• citizen media and protest movements;
• the ethics of witnessing and solidarity;
• playful forms of self-mediation (parody, satire);
• the threat of co-optation: containing the subversive within existing structures of political and corporate power;
• citizen media and the discursive constitution of public selves;
• citizen media and the construction of communities;
• citizen media and ‘the democratic deficit’;
• citizen media practices and piracy.

The programme is designed to ensure maximum participation by all attendees, and to allow sufficient time for discussion and exchange of views. There will be no parallel panels, and presentation slots are, therefore, limited. Plenary speakers are:

• Stuart Allan, Professor of Journalism and Director of the Centre for Journalism and Communication Research at Bournemouth University, UK. He has published widely on the emergence and development of news on the Internet, the online reporting of war, conflict and crisis, science journalism, and citizen journalism. His most recent book, Citizen Witnessing: Revisioning Journalism in Times of Crisis, was published by Polity in January 2013.

• Bolette Blaagaard, Assistant Professor at Aalborg University, Denmark and former Research Fellow at City University, London, where she was involved in setting up an international network to debate issues of citizenship and journalism, as well as carrying out research on citizen journalism and its implications for journalistic practices and education. She is co-editor of After Cosmopolitanism (Routlege 2012) and Deconstructing Europe (Routledge 2011).

• Simon Lindgren, Professor of Sociology at Umeå University, Sweden. He researches digital culture with a focus on social connections, social organization and social movements. He is actively taking part in developing theoretical as well as methodological tools for analysing discursive and social network aspects of the evolving new media landscape. His publications cover themes like hacktivism, digital piracy, citizen journalism, subcultural creativity and learning, popular culture and visual politics. Simon is the author of New Noise: A Cultural Sociology of Digital Disruption (2013).

• Ivan Sigal, Executive Director and co-founder of Global Voices, a community of more than 700 authors and 600 translators around the world who collect and make available reports from blogs and citizen media everywhere, with emphasis on voices that are not ordinarily heard in international mainstream media. He is author of White Road (Steidl Verlag 2012) and has extensive experience in supporting and training journalists and working on media co-productions in the Soviet Union and Asia.

If you are interested in presenting a paper, please send an abstract of 300 words by 15 April 2013 to Mona Baker (mona.baker@manchester.ac.uk) or Luis Pérez-González (Luis.Perez-Gonzalez@manchester.ac.uk). Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by 25 April 2013.

Registration fees (to include lunch and refreshments on 13 and 14 June): Full registration: £50. Student registration: £30.

• See http://citizenmediacolloquium.wordpress.com

August 2, 2012

‘Drone journalism’ focus for workshop

‘Drone journalism’ is coming to the UK, in perhaps the first event of its kind in Europe (the US is already ahead on this one, with the creation of the Drone Journalism Lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s College of Journalism and Mass Communications, led by Matt Waite.)

The Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism (RISJ) will host a workshop on 22 October to examine the use of drone aircraft in newsgathering and to make recommendations for policy and best practices. The event is co-sponsored by the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford.
Advances in aviation and electronic control systems are now allowing drone aircraft/UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) to move from military to civilian applications and they have potential uses and benefits for newsgathering by providing aerial platforms for photography and videography. Because of their relatively small size, they are portable and can easily be moved to locations were reporting needs to take place.
Drones will alter aerial newsgathering, which is now done primarily via helicopter and light aircraft, by reducing the cost of operations, making them available to a larger number of news organizations, and increasing the uses of aerial platforms in different types of reporting. Potential uses include traffic observation, crowd observation (events, demonstrations, and civil disorders), observing events and activities in areas where land-based access is restricted, and in both sports and entertainment production.

The development of drone technology and the increasing desire for its use in civilian contexts creates a variety of policy, regulatory, and ethical challenges. This workshop is designed to document the issues and formulate recommendations regarding their deployment in the UK, Europe, and globally and thus influence future policy debates. Policy issues include aviation law, flight regulation, and privacy concerns.

The event is being organised by Prof. Robert G. Picard, Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, University of Oxford, David Goldberg, Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, University of Oxford, and Daniel Bennett, War Studies Department, Kings College London.

- See http://meejalaw.com/2012/08/01/new-event-22-october-reuters-institute-for-the-study-of-journalism-workshop-on-use-of-drones-in-news-gathering-and-event-coverage/

-Contact: tel: +44 (0)1865 611 080; email: reuters.institute@politics.ox.ac.uk

April 1, 2012

Role of the web in promoting hate

Dusan Babic, a Sarajevo-based media researcher and analyst, reports on a major conference tackling hate-speech in South Eastern Europe

The role of the internet in promoting hate speech in South Eastern Europe was the subject of a conference in Sarajevo in November 2011. The event was jointly organised by the Council of Europe, the Press Council in Bosnia-Herzegovina, a self-regulatory body for print and online media, and the Association of B-H Journalists (BH Novinari).

The conference, titled Living Together, was an outcome of a Council of Europe project launched in 2009, and produced a handbook on standards on the media’s contribution to social cohesion, intercultural dialogue, understanding, tolerance and democratic participation.

Although the conference covered a wide range of issues - such as the European legal framework, national regulation and practice and the role of self-regulation in combating hate speech - the prevailing opinion among the conference participants was that the internet was to blame for spreading hate speech.

In 2010, I conducted a survey and analysis of the most-popular web portals in three central states of the former Yugoslavia - Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina - commissioned by Sarajevo-based Media Plan Institute. I concluded that there were glaring examples of hate speech (largely a legacy of the wars of the 1990s) but they had not yet become a ‘mass phenomenon’ (see The internet: Freedom without boundaries?, Media Plan Institute, Sarajevo, 2010).

November 27, 2008

training for journalsits and PR people on coverage of asylum seekers and refugees

For colleagues in the UK: a Norwich-based organisation is offering free media training  on 9 December for journalists, public relations workers and media officers on media coverage of asylum and refugee issues.

As part of the City of Refuge Community programme, the New Writing Partnership will be holding a daylong training event on media coverage of asylum and refugee issues aimed at journalists, public relations workers and media officers on media coverage of asylum and refugee issues.  The training will be delivered by the Exiled Journalists’ Network (EJN).

This training event is free.
Date:  9th of December.
Venue:  The New Writing Partnership, 14 Princes Street, Norwich, NR3 1AE

April 13, 2008

Public integrity symposium (Florida, 2009)

CALL FOR PAPERS: 2009 Public Integrity Symposium

Ethics Education and Training
Ethics education and training are no longer cottage industries in higher education, business, government, or the world of NGOs. There is a rapidly growing consensus, as well as empirical evidence, that sound ethical practices and behavior go hand-in-hand with high performance, better products and services, and improved governance. These forward steps are truly exciting. Still, there is much to do and to learn.

This symposium seeks to advance our knowledge of the successes and failures, tools and methods, costs and return on investments in ethics education and training. Authors are invited to submit abstracts of papers to be considered for inclusion in the symposium. A multi-disciplinary approach is welcomed. Paper topics include but are not limited to:
Current trends and practices in any discipline or within a field of practice
Cross disciplinary developments in business, public administration, social work, criminal justice, and other fields
Normative ethics theory/practice
Educational and training methods and approaches
Cases involving success stories or failures
Assessments of educational and training programs
Inventory and assessment of ethics centers and institutes
Roles of professional accrediting bodies such as the National Schools of Public Affairs & Administration
International training and education including trans-national organizations such as the U.N. and the World Bank
Professional associations
Ethics management in organizations
Leadership ethics
Decision making theories
New Public Management ethics training

Given the limited space available for the symposium in Public Integrity, it is anticipated that a book length manuscript will also be produced to include an expanded number of high quality papers.

Deadlines
June 1, 2008               Abstract
October 1, 2008          Manuscript draft (All papers will be subject to blind refereeing.)
November 15, 2008    Revised manuscript submitted (All manuscripts must be submitted with APA style & formatting.)
December 15, 2008    Manuscript acceptance notification

Send Abstract/Paper in Word 2003 to:
Donald C. Menzel, Ph.D. & Symposium Editor
donmenzel@tampabay.rr.com

3930 American Drive
Tampa, FL 33634
U.S.A.
813-886-6332

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