ICE blogs

July 26, 2009

ES editorial reproduced in top US journal

The editorial in Ethical Space Vol 6, No 1 on “Deep Throat and the ethics of scandal coverage” has been reproduced in the latest issue of the prestigious, Boston-based journal Media Ethics. Joint editor Richard Lance Keeble argued that the revelation by Mark Felt, FBI deputy associate director, that he was, in fact, the “Deep Throat” whistleblower of Watergate fame exposed many of the dominant myths about investigative reporting.

In effect, the Washington Post reporters, Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, were exploited by a disgruntled FBI chief in his plot against the US President. “The FBI attacks on Nixon amounted to a massive news story - but the Washington Post never reported it.”

The issue of Media Ethics also carries a critique of the recent coverage of Somalia in the UK’s corporate media by Richard Keeble. Most of the reporting has focused on pirate attacks on Western shipping. Somalia currently faces one of the world’s biggest humanitarian disasters - yet this has been largely ignored, Keeble argues.

On the front page, Jane B. Singer calls for moderation when newspapers moderate blog comments while elsewhere Russell Frank examines the coverage of the 2008 Presidential campaign.

June 24, 2009

Call for abstracts: The annual conference of the Institute of Communication Ethics

‘I’m an ethicist…get me out of here’: Communication, celebrity and conscience in a global media age


The annual conference of the Institute of Communication Ethics


When: Wednesday October 28, 2009 10 am-1 pm Where: Start Up Cafe, Coventry University, Priory Street, Coventry CV1 5SB All welcome!


Call for abstracts

The conference aims to explore the many ethical issues facing communication professionals and academics in the global media age.


Thus papers may wish to examine some of the following questions:


  • Can we speak meaningfully of global ethical communication standards?
  • To what extent is the concept of global public sphere/s useful in understanding contemporary communication issues?
  • What are the ethical dilemmas (for both journalists and citizens) associated with the now globalised social networking sites?
  • Does the politics of celebrity culture serve to marginalise more significant issues and perspectives (thus contributing to the ‘dumbing down’ of the media and the rise of ‘churnalism’)?
  • Can the contradictions within the celebrity culture be explored for progressive purposes: for instance, can issues relating to racism, sexism, disability and class be explored in Reality TV programmes?
  • To what extent does celebrity coverage reinforce a culture of cruelty?
  • To what extent has the celebrity culture invaded the world of politics?


In addition papers may wish to focus on:


  • Case studies of celebrity coverage and manufacture eg Jade Goody, David Beckham; Piers Morgan, Simon Cowell; Britney Spears, Madonna
  • The globalisation of the celebrity culture: within hours of appearing on Britain’s got talent Susan Boyle became a global superstar - thanks to YouTube.
  • Comparative case studies - celebrity coverage in contrasting cultures (eg Nigeria and the US)
  • Comparative case studies of PR promotion in contrasting cultures


Abstracts of 200 words should be sent to Prof Richard Lance Keeble at rkeeble@lincoln.ac.uk by September 14, 2009. Feedback following peer review will be given back within 10 days. Selected contributions will appear in a future edition of Ethical Space: The International Journal of Communication Ethics (www.communicationethics.net).


Attendance at the conference will cost £55. Please send cheques payable to ‘Institute of Communication Ethics’ c/o Fiona Thompson, Faculty of Media, Business & Marketing, Leeds Trinity & All Saints, Brownberrie Lane, Horsforth, Leeds LS18 5HD.


The ICE conference will be followed by the major international ‘Is world journalism in crisis’ conference, in the Humber Theatre, Coventry University 2-5 pm

December 15, 2008

Ethical Space Book No. 2

Filed under: Blogroll, ethical space editors blog, Headlines, journalism, professional ethics — news_editor @ 7:29 pm

Communication Ethics Now, drawing together articles from Volume 2 (2005) of Ethical Space: The International Journal of Communication Ethics, has just been published. In a foreword, Cees Hamelink, professor emeritus of International Communication at the University of Amsterdam, comments: ‘Ethical inquiry needs to be more creative and deconstruct situations that look like dilemmas into configurations of a wide variety of moral options and challenges. We are very fortunate to have such important platforms as Communication Ethics Now for this exercise in new forms of reflection!’

He adds: ‘This book convincingly demonstrates how lively and relevant today’s ethical reflections on communication can be. The chapters of the book cover such an exciting and broad range of topics.’

Edited by Richard Keeble, joint editor of Ethical Space, the 25 chapters are divided into five sections. In the first, which focuses on journalism ethics, John Tulloch examines the British press’s coverage of the CIA torture flights (better known as ‘extraordinary rendition’) while Julie-ann Davies reports on the media’s increasing use of anonymous sources. Jane Taylor takes a particularly unusual look at the media’s obsession with celebrity focusing on the coverage of Carole Chaplin, Cherie Blair’s ’style guru’ and broadcaster, novelist and columnist Libby Purves expresses outrage at the media’s daily diet of ‘unkind intrusions and falsifications’.

In an international section, leading Nigerian academic Kate Azuka Omenugha explores the representation of Africanness in the British press, Susanne Fengler and Stephan Russ-Mohl express concern over the slump in media standards in Germany while Angelika W. Wyka focuses on journalistic standards and democratization of the mass media in Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic.

In a section that takes a historical perspective on journalism ethics, Jane Chapman’s chapter looks at ‘Republican Citizenship, Ethics and the French Revolutionary Press 1789-92′ while Martin Conboy focuses on Wooler’s Black Dwarf, a radical journal of the early 19th century.

Another section on communication ethics and pedagogy draws on papers at the 2005 annual conference of the Institute of Communication Ethics with contributions from Raphael Cohen-Almagor, John Strain, Brian Hoey, Brian Morris, Simon Goldsworthy and Anne Gregory. The philosophical dimensions of communication ethics are explored by Karen Sanders, Hallvard Johannes Fossheim (in an interview with Kristine Lowe) Robert Beckett, Moira Carroll-Mayer and Bernd Carsten Stahl. In the final section on business and communication ethics, Kristine Lowe interviews Paul Jackson, of Manchester Business School.

Editor Richard Keeble, in an introduction, says: ‘The Institute of Communication Ethics (ICE) stresses in its mission statement: “Communication ethics is the founding philosophy for human interaction that defines issues according to their impact on human well-being and relationships.” And it is this caring for people - the desperately poor, the inarticulate, the oppressed - along with a sense that honesty, integrity, clarity, respect for difference and diversity are some of the core principles underlying human interaction and, ultimately, communication ethics that drive the many writings in this volume.’

  • Communication Ethics Now is published by Troubador, Leicester, for £12.99. For more details see: www.troubador.co.uk. It follows the success of Communication Ethics Today, also published by Troubador, which drew on articles in the first volume of Ethical Space. See www.troubador.co.uk.

April 13, 2008

Public integrity symposium (Florida, 2009)

CALL FOR PAPERS: 2009 Public Integrity Symposium

Ethics Education and Training
Ethics education and training are no longer cottage industries in higher education, business, government, or the world of NGOs. There is a rapidly growing consensus, as well as empirical evidence, that sound ethical practices and behavior go hand-in-hand with high performance, better products and services, and improved governance. These forward steps are truly exciting. Still, there is much to do and to learn.

This symposium seeks to advance our knowledge of the successes and failures, tools and methods, costs and return on investments in ethics education and training. Authors are invited to submit abstracts of papers to be considered for inclusion in the symposium. A multi-disciplinary approach is welcomed. Paper topics include but are not limited to:
Current trends and practices in any discipline or within a field of practice
Cross disciplinary developments in business, public administration, social work, criminal justice, and other fields
Normative ethics theory/practice
Educational and training methods and approaches
Cases involving success stories or failures
Assessments of educational and training programs
Inventory and assessment of ethics centers and institutes
Roles of professional accrediting bodies such as the National Schools of Public Affairs & Administration
International training and education including trans-national organizations such as the U.N. and the World Bank
Professional associations
Ethics management in organizations
Leadership ethics
Decision making theories
New Public Management ethics training

Given the limited space available for the symposium in Public Integrity, it is anticipated that a book length manuscript will also be produced to include an expanded number of high quality papers.

Deadlines
June 1, 2008               Abstract
October 1, 2008          Manuscript draft (All papers will be subject to blind refereeing.)
November 15, 2008    Revised manuscript submitted (All manuscripts must be submitted with APA style & formatting.)
December 15, 2008    Manuscript acceptance notification

Send Abstract/Paper in Word 2003 to:
Donald C. Menzel, Ph.D. & Symposium Editor
donmenzel@tampabay.rr.com

3930 American Drive
Tampa, FL 33634
U.S.A.
813-886-6332

March 12, 2008

Promoting new forms of ethical reflection

Communication Ethics Now, which draws together articles from Volume 2 (2005) of Ethical Space: The International Journal of Communication Ethics, is to be published on 15 July 2008. In a foreword, Cees Hamelink, Professor Emeritus of International Communication at the University of Amsterdam, comments: ‘Ethical inquiry needs to be more creative and deconstruct situations that look like dilemmas into configurations of a wide variety of moral options and challenges. We are very fortunate to have such important platforms as Communication Ethics Now for this exercise in new forms of reflection!’

He adds: ‘This book convincingly demonstrates how lively and relevant today’s ethical reflections on communication can be. The chapters of the book cover such an exciting and broad range of topics.’

Edited by Richard Keeble, joint editor of Ethical Space, the 25 chapters are divided into five sections. In the first, which focuses journalism ethics, John Tulloch examines the British press’s coverage of the CIA torture flights (better known as ‘extraordinary rendition’) while Julie-ann Davies reports on the media’s increasing use of anonymous sources. Jane Taylor takes a particularly unusual look at the media’s obsession with celebrity focusing on the coverage of Carole Chaplin, Cherie Blair’s ’style guru’ and broadcaster, novelist and columnist Libby Purves expresses outrage at the media’s daily diet of ‘unkind intrusions and falsifications’.

In an international section, leading Nigerian academic Kate Azuka Omenugha explores the representation of Africanness in the British press, Susanne Fengler and Stephan Russ-Mohl express concern over the slump in media standards in Germany while Angelika W. Wyka focuses on journalistic standards and democratization of the mass media in Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic.

In a section that takes a historical perspective on journalism ethics, Jane Chapman’s chapter looks at ‘Republican Citizenship, Ethics and the French Revolutionary Press 1789-92′ while Martin Conboy’s focuses on Wooler’s Black Dwarf, a radical journal of the early 19th century.

Another section on communication ethics and pedagogy draws on papers at the 2005 annual conference of the Institute of Communication Ethics with contributions from Raphael Cohen-Almagor, John Strain, Brian Hoey, Brian Morris, Simon Goldsworthy and Anne Gregory. The philosophical dimensions of communication ethics are explored by Karen Sanders, Hallvard Johannes Fossheim (in an interview with Kristine Lowe) Robert Beckett, Moira Carroll-Mayer and Bernd Carsten Stahl. In the final section on business and communication ethics, Kristine Lowe interviews Paul Jackson, of Manchester Business School.

Editor Richard Keeble, in an introduction, says: ‘The Institute of Communication Ethics (ICE) stresses in its mission statement: “Communication ethics is the founding philosophy for human interaction that defines issues according to their impact on human well-being and relationships.” And it is this caring for people - the desperately poor, the inarticulate, the oppressed - along with a sense that honesty, integrity, clarity, respect for difference and diversity are some of the core principles underlying human interaction and, ultimately, communication ethics that drive the many writings in this volume.’

  • Communication Ethics Now is published by Troubador, Leicester, for £12.99. It follows the success of Communication Ethics Today, also published by Troubador, which drew on articles in the first volume of Ethical Space.

March 1, 2008

Acclaimed photo was fake

Filed under: News, Headlines, journalism, professional ethics, photojournalism — news_editor @ 1:47 am

Nature reports that an award-winning photograph of a herd of endangered Tibetan antelopes apparently undisturbed by a passing train on the controversial Qinghai–Tibet railway has been exposed as a fake. The image was widely hailed in China as a symbol of harmonious co-existence between man and nature and strong testimony against any adverse effect of the new railway on the animals. Photographer Liu Wei-qiang admitted the fabrication last week after comments on the Chinese online photography forum Without Fear questioned the picture’s authenticity. Liu was promptly dismissed from the Daqing Evening News, based in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, where he was the deputy director of its photography department. The newspaper has also issued a public statement apologizing for the incident and announcing the resignation of its chief editor. ‘The train was real, and so were the antelopes,’ said Liu in a posting on the photography forum. ‘But the magic moment just didn’t happen even after I had waited for two weeks.’ Therefore, he decided to merge together one picture of a passing train with another of the migrating animals ‘to raise the public awareness of antelope protection’. The merged picture was published by more than 200 media outlets around the world and won Liu a bronze medal in the 2006 Most Influential News Photos of the Year competition, sponsored by CCTV, China’s state television. ‘The truth is probably the opposite of what the picture was trying to claim,’ says Su Jian-ping, a zoologist at the Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, in Xining, Qinghai province. (Nature)

January 10, 2008

an excellent professional ethics group

Filed under: professional ethics — news_editor @ 10:46 pm

From Stephen Cohen (s.cohen@unsw.edu.au), posted on the AAPAE list:

Membership fees for 2008 for the Australian Association for Professional and Applied Ethics (AAPAE) are now due.
A membership form is available at the AAPAE website:
http://www.arts.unsw.edu.au/aapae/
click on ‘membership’

Benefits of membership include
Subscription to the Association’s journal, The Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics
Discounted registration fee at the Annual National Conference
The Association’s newsletter, Australian Ethics
A copy of the edited Proceedings of the Annual Conference
Issues of Res Publica
Membership fees:

  • individual $100
  • institution $200
  • concession (students and low income) $50
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