ICE blogs

April 19, 2008

Symposium for scholars at Media Reform conference (Minneapolis)

Filed under: News, Headlines, media policy, journalism, conferences — news_editor @ 10:51 pm

This is a quick update and reminder about the symposium for scholars which will take place in Minneapolis on June 5th, a day before the National Conference on Media Reform.  The symposium is called ‘Academic Research for Media Reform’ and the program is now online. Otagizers are calling it a ‘unique opportunity’ to engage in a dialogue between academics and media reform advocates.

The program offers an expansive presentation of scholarship on the most pressing issues in the media reform community.  The program committee - through a double-blind peer review process - generated eight sessions of papers submitted by leading academics from the US’s top schools.  The sessions will focus on media ownership (and the FCC’s research effort), sustainability of independent media, access to dominant platforms, network neutrality, international media reform efforts, and the media reform movement itself.

The symposium also features two special sessions.  There will be an opportunity for a roundtable discussion with members of the ‘future of American telecommunications working group’. This group is currently designing a new media and telecommunications policy framework for the new administration in 2009. In addition, there will be a session on ‘copyright and free speech’ in which Neil Netanel will present his new book Copyright’s Paradox.

All registrants to the symposium are eligible for the early-bird fare for the NCMR itself.

Organizers:
Amit M. Schejter, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Telecommunications Pennsylvania State University
Ben Scott Policy Director Free Press

Media education summit (UK)

Filed under: News, Headlines, journalism, conferences, media education — news_editor @ 10:45 pm

We are pleased to invite you to attend the Media Education Summit 2008 and to call for proposals for creative contributions and posters.

This event is organized by The Centre for Excellence in Media Practice, hosted by Bournemouth University and supported by Skillset and the Art, Design and Media Higher Education Subject Centre.

Conference Details

Media Education Summit Monday 1st September & Tuesday 2nd September 2008

This national conference will provide valuable insights into the opportunities and challenges facing media education now and in the future.

Themes

  • Convergence - implications for HE
  • Media Practice 2020 - industrial and educational perspectives
  • Employer engagement an government policy
  • The launch on the 14-19 Creative Media Diploma
  • The creation of the Skillset Screen and Media Academies
  • Students reflecting on their creative practice
  • Using new technologies to engage students

Confirmed Speakers

  • Anthony Lilley, CEO Magic Lantern
  • Prof Stephen Heppell, The Centre for Excellence in Media Practice
  • Kate O’Connor, Deputy CEO, Skillset
  • Dr Julian McDougall, Newman University College
  • Dr Andrew Burn, Institute of Education
  • Dr Julian Sefton-Green, University of South Australia

Fees: Early Bird GBP125 (before 30th June), Full Rate GBP175 (after 30 June)

Call for Creative Contributions, and Poster Presentations

Proposals for short screenings, posters, foyer demonstrations and performances related to the conference themes of Policy, Philosophy and Pedagogy are invited.

Please submit short proposals (up to 500 words plus other artefacts or information as relevant) by 30th June 2008.

There will be designated time to enable poster presenters to share their work in person. The poster session allows a more interactive forum for communication and collaborative discussion. The poster presenter must be present during the period assigned for discussion.

Please send proposals and any queries to: info@cemp.ac.uk

Further details can be found at www.cemp.ac.uk/summit together with information on how to register to attend.

Jon Wardle co-director the Centre for Excellence in Media Practice, The Media School, Bournemouth University 01202 965907 www.cemp.ac.uk

Australian media educators conference (Adelaide)

Filed under: News, Headlines, conferences, media education — news_editor @ 10:38 pm

National Media Education Conference (SAAME)

Adelaide 26-28 September

2008 Conference Theme, Digital Dialogues: Moving Media Education

Hawke Building, City West Campus, University of South Australia

Call for papers and workshops
The digital future is upon us and we ought to be talking about the digital present. How are students, teachers and media education
accommodating and responding to the changes brought by the digital revolution ? Where is Media Education now and where is it heading?

Children and young people now have more choices as consumers, readers, viewers, creators and producers of media than their parents and even older siblings had, and their communicative power is considerable. Media that used to be exclusive and expensive is now everywhere and everyday. With so much availability and opportunity for creativity, what are the practices that we find ourselves engaged with as consumers, producers, educators, and citizens?

This conference invites papers and workshops that engage with the most current issues, challenges and practices in media education. Papers will be accepted in peer-reviewed and non-reviewed streams. Workshops may provide examples of teaching and learning innovation, excellence, and engagement with media practices and projects.

We welcome papers and workshops on a broad range of topics and here are a few suggested themes:

Fostering Media Cultures; Me Media: More Than Just a Marketing Mantra?; Media Making; Developing Digital Literacy; IP: Creating/Quoting; Teaching Ethics in a Changing Media Culture; Indigenous Media Communities; Who are the Net Gen and What Do They Do?; Media Regulation; New Media and Old Moral Panics; Relevant Education for Media Workers; Social Networking Sites and Services; Encouraging Childrens’ Creativity with Media; Open-source in the Classroom; Personal Technologies, Creativity and Education; Cyber-bullying in Youth Culture
All abstracts and papers will be double blind, peer-reviewed.

Submit 200 word abstract by 28th April, 2008 to
www.conferenceplus.com.au/mediaeduconf08

Follow the instructions under ‘Lodge Abstracts’

Response Schedule:

Notification of Abstract Acceptance 12th May Full Paper Due 16 June
Notification of Paper Acceptance 7 July Final (Revised) Paper Due 4
August

Early Bird Registration Closes 11 August

All peer-reviewed papers will be considered for publication in Southern
Review.

Please submit any questions relating to your abstarct to Grant Brindal
at bigred@chariot.net.au

Grant Brindal Conference Convenor

April 13, 2008

Public integrity symposium (Florida, 2009)

CALL FOR PAPERS: 2009 Public Integrity Symposium

Ethics Education and Training
Ethics education and training are no longer cottage industries in higher education, business, government, or the world of NGOs. There is a rapidly growing consensus, as well as empirical evidence, that sound ethical practices and behavior go hand-in-hand with high performance, better products and services, and improved governance. These forward steps are truly exciting. Still, there is much to do and to learn.

This symposium seeks to advance our knowledge of the successes and failures, tools and methods, costs and return on investments in ethics education and training. Authors are invited to submit abstracts of papers to be considered for inclusion in the symposium. A multi-disciplinary approach is welcomed. Paper topics include but are not limited to:
Current trends and practices in any discipline or within a field of practice
Cross disciplinary developments in business, public administration, social work, criminal justice, and other fields
Normative ethics theory/practice
Educational and training methods and approaches
Cases involving success stories or failures
Assessments of educational and training programs
Inventory and assessment of ethics centers and institutes
Roles of professional accrediting bodies such as the National Schools of Public Affairs & Administration
International training and education including trans-national organizations such as the U.N. and the World Bank
Professional associations
Ethics management in organizations
Leadership ethics
Decision making theories
New Public Management ethics training

Given the limited space available for the symposium in Public Integrity, it is anticipated that a book length manuscript will also be produced to include an expanded number of high quality papers.

Deadlines
June 1, 2008               Abstract
October 1, 2008          Manuscript draft (All papers will be subject to blind refereeing.)
November 15, 2008    Revised manuscript submitted (All manuscripts must be submitted with APA style & formatting.)
December 15, 2008    Manuscript acceptance notification

Send Abstract/Paper in Word 2003 to:
Donald C. Menzel, Ph.D. & Symposium Editor
donmenzel@tampabay.rr.com

3930 American Drive
Tampa, FL 33634
U.S.A.
813-886-6332

April 9, 2008

Adbuster fights to show ’subvertisements’ on Canadian TV

Filed under: News, Headlines, advertising ethics, media policy, human rights — news_editor @ 10:01 pm

The media activism site RINF reports that one of Adbusters’ founders is fighting TV owners in the courts for the right to buy advertising time from them, arguing that, in exercising their editorial control, they are restricting the public right to communicate over the airwaves. RINF’s reporter James Ewart writes:

Kalle Lasn is a fighter for the right to communicate. A privilege, says the founder of Adbusters magazine, that goes one step farther than the freedom of speech.

‘You can stand on the corner and shout at people as they are going by,’ Lasn says. ‘But if a handful of corporations have media in their pocket, they can totally hoodwink the public.’

From his home in Vancouver, Lasn himself communicates to the masses on the pages of Adbusters—a 10-year-old culture-jamming magazine published through the Adbusters Media Foundation.

On Feb. 18, the Supreme Court of British Columbia dismissed a case that Lasn brought forth, which argued that Canadian TV conglomerate CanWest Global was obligated, under the Canadian Broadcasting Act, to sell television advertising time to Adbusters.

The court’s dismissal reiterated the rulings of North American courts that have found private TV broadcasters under no obligation to allow the public access to public airwaves.

‘This case goes right to the very heart of democracy—[about] who has a voice and who doesn’t,’ Lasn says.

Of the major broadcasters, only CNN has aired Adbusters’ ‘Buy Nothing Day’ commercials (or ’subvertisements’) that tell people not to go shopping the Friday after Thanksgiving.

One of the subvertisements mocks Calvin Klein’s black-and-white underwear ads. This 30-second parody concludes with an ultra-slim model replaced by a more normally proportioned woman bent over a toilet as if giving into a bulimic impulse. ‘Why are nine out of 10 women dissatisfied with some aspect of their own bodies?’ the narrator asks blankly. ‘The beauty industry is the beast.’

(The rejected ads, along with the tape-recorded refusals from major media organizations, are available at http://www.adbusters.org.)

Lasn first filed his suit in 1995, after the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) terminated an advertising contract when the automobile industry complained about an Adbusters anti-car ad. The Supreme Court of Canada, however, chose not to hear the case.

In 2004, following a string of CanWest refusals to air any of Adbusters’ 30-second TV parodies that ridiculed the forestry, fast food, pharmaceutical and high fashion industries, Lasn filed suit against the corporation, which owns three major daily newspapers and a majority of TV stations in Vancouver.

‘We just want this high-minded, legal right to walk into a television station and buy airtime under the same rules and conditions as advertising agencies do,’ Lasn says.

Adbusters is considering an appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada—again.

‘We’re not just trying to win a legal battle,’ Lasn says. ‘We’re trying to create a sort of media literacy lesson for all the people in North America to show the fact that there is no democracy on the public airwaves.’

‘It’s pretty ridiculous that a nonprofit, public interest group can’t buy advertising on the public airwaves,’ says Steve Anderson, coordinator of the nonprofit Canadian Campaign for Democratic Media. ‘What’s interesting is that the CBC, specifically, wouldn’t allow this, because the CBC, unlike PBS [in the United States], runs advertisements.’

Lasn is optimistic about efforts to democratize the public airwaves, and says he may bring suit against U.S. broadcasters under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) rather than on constitutional grounds, where U.S. courts have consistently sided with broadcasters.

Currently in development is an ad for Adbusters’ Blackspot shoes, which are made at a union factory out of organic hemp and old tires. When the Blackspot ads are finished, Lasn plans to pitch them to MTV. Unlike previous ads, the Blackspot ad will promote a product, and therefore not be restricted by broadcasters’ advocacy ad guidelines.

‘This actually happens fairly frequently [in the United States], that groups try to buy ad time and networks refuse to sell it,’ says Angela Campbell, a law professor at Georgetown University and director of its Institute for Public Representation, a program at the school that specializes in Federal Communications Commission (FCC) issues. ‘The court almost always sides with the broadcasters,’ she says.

Campbell points to the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court decision in CBS v. Democratic National Committee. Major news networks were pressured to air ads opposing the Vietnam War, and the high court ruled that broadcasters can control editorial content, and are thus free to choose what ads they want to run.

Campbell says the court cited the Fairness Doctrine, which obligated broadcasters to air different perspectives on an issue. And because the networks’ coverage of the Vietnam War was already in accordance with the statute, it was not necessary for the public to see ads against the war.

‘Subsequently, our FCC repealed the Fairness Doctrine,’ she says, ‘and one could argue that today, when we don’t have the Fairness Doctrine as sort of that backstop, it’s questionable if the case would come out the same way.’

In theory, broadcasters are supposed to serve the public, and that is the standard the FCC uses for granting and renewing broadcast licenses for networks to use the airwaves.

‘The majority of the FCC today takes the attitude that public interest means whatever the marketplace will bear,’ Campbell says. ‘There are some public interests they are concerned about, but they don’t have very many enforceable standards. So the stations can do pretty much whatever they want.’

Ultimately, Lasn hopes to begin dismantling media conglomerates with antitrust lawsuits, demanding the media devote at least a minute of public airtime for every hour devoted to corporate interests, and establishing a new human right—the right to communicate.

‘How come we the people don’t have access to one of the most powerful social communication mediums of our time, the television?’ Lasn asks. ‘There is this new human right in the information age, this right to communicate, which goes farther than freedom of speech.’

Conference on media education: digital dialogues (Australia)

Filed under: Headlines, conferences, media education — news_editor @ 9:48 pm

NATIONAL MEDIA EDUCATION CONFERENCE (SAAME)
ADELAIDE 26-28 SEPTEMBER 2008
Conference Theme, Digital Dialogues: Moving Media Education

HAWKE BUILDING
CITY WEST CAMPUS
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA

CALL FOR PAPERS AND WORKSHOPS

The digital future is upon us and we ought to be talking about the digital present. How are students, teachers and media education accommodating and responding to the changes brought by the digital revolution ? Where is Media Education now and where is it heading?

Children and young people now have more choices as consumers, readers, viewers, creators and producers of media than their parents and even older siblings had, and their communicative power is considerable. Media that used to be exclusive and expensive is now everywhere and everyday. With so much availability and opportunity for creativity, what are the practices that we find ourselves engaged with as consumers, producers, educators, and citizens?

This conference invites papers and workshops that engage with the most current issues, challenges and practices in media education. Papers will be accepted in peer-reviewed and non-reviewed streams. Workshops may provide examples of teaching and learning innovation, excellence, and engagement with media practices and projects.

We welcome papers and workshops on a broad range of topics and here are a few suggested themes:

Fostering Media Cultures; Me Media: More Than Just a Marketing Mantra?; Media Making; Developing Digital Literacy; IP: Creating/Quoting; Teaching Ethics in a Changing Media Culture; Indigenous Media Communities; Who are the Net Gen and What Do They Do?; Media Regulation; New Media and Old Moral Panics; Relevant Education for Media Workers; Social Networking Sites and Services; Encouraging Children’s Creativity with Media; Open-source in the Classroom; Personal Technologies, Creativity and Education; Cyber-bullying in Youth Culture

All abstracts and papers will be double blind, peer-reviewed.

Submit 200 word abstract by 28th April, 2008 to www.conferenceplus.com.au/mediaeduconf08
Follow the instructions under Lodge Abstracts

Response Schedule:

Notification of Abstract Acceptance 12th May
Full Paper Due 16 June
Notification of Paper Acceptance 7 July
Final (Revised) Paper Due 4 August

Early Bird Registration Closes 11 August

All peer-reviewed papers will be considered for publication in Southern Review.

Please submit any questions relating to your abstarct to Grant Brindal at bigred@chariot.net.au

Grant Brindal
Conference Convenor

April 1, 2008

conference on human rights and peace

Filed under: ethical space editors blog, Headlines, politics, conflict, conferences, human rights — news_editor @ 9:58 pm

Activating Human Rights and Peace

An International Conference
1-4 July 2008
Byron Bay Community and Cultural Centre,
Byron Bay NSW, Australia

“I welcome the conference on Activating Human Rights and Peace that the Centre for Peace and Social Justice of Southern Cross University is hosting between 1-4 July 2008. It is easy to talk about human rights and peace. Forests of trees are destroyed in the documentation dealing with these subjects. However, activating them and translating aspirations into reality is the real challenge for our species and our world. A meeting devoted to translating ideas into action will be well timed in mid-2008. I hope that there will be a strong attendance with many notions to challenge the mind and to inspire action.”
- Justice Michael Kirby, Patron, Centre for Peace and Social Justice.

Confirmed Keynotes:

Aruna Gopinath
Dr, Head, Dept of Politics & International Relations, HELP University College, Malaysia

Judy Atkinson,
Professor, Gnibi the College of Indigenous Australian Peoples, Southern Cross University, Australia

Dede Oetomo
Dr, Airlangga University and Founder, Gaya Nusantara, Indonesia

Mutassim Abu El Hawa
The Arava Institute for Environmental Studies
Kibbutz Ketura, Israel

Ilana Meallem
The Arava Institute for Environmental Studies
Kibbutz Ketura, Israel

Graham Innes
Human Rights Commissioner, Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission, Australia

Adrien Wing
Bessie Dutton Murray Professor of Law, University of Iowa Law School, USA

Ranbir Singh
Professor and Vice-Chancellor, Nalsar University of Law, India

Kevin Clements
Professor and Director, Australian Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies, University of Queensland, Australia

Bee Chen Goh
Professor, Head of School of Law and Justice, Southern Cross University

Please send proposals for 20-25 minute papers, with a 200-word
abstract by 26 February 2008 (Late submissions will be considered). Please see website for details.

Send to: cpsjpapers@scu.edu.au

The conference will have a mix of plenary sessions with invited papers, and panel sessions. The conference organisers welcome papers from scholars, researchers, postgraduates, activists, community groups and policy makers.

See the book Activating Human Rights, edited by Elisabeth Porter and Baden Offord (Peter Lang, Oxford, 2006).
This conference is hosted by the Centre for Peace and Social Justice, Southern Cross University; in collaboration with the Hawke Research Institute’s Centre for Peace, Conflict & Mediation, University of South Australia; the Australian Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies, University of Queensland, and NALSAR University of Law, Hyderabad, India, and the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission, Australia.

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